TE Connectivity's New Board-to-Board Stacking Connectors Offer a Way to Upgrade COM Express Applications to 16 GT/s Speeds

By Tiera Oliver

Associate Editor

Embedded Computing Design

February 01, 2021

News

TE Connectivity's New Board-to-Board Stacking Connectors Offer a Way to Upgrade COM Express Applications to 16 GT/s Speeds

TE Connectivity introduced a new generation of free height computer-on-module (COM) connectors in 0.5mm centerline to address vertical, parallel board-to-board connections that require high-speed data transmission and different stacking heights. These new connectors are compliant with the COM Express Type 7 specification and can be compatible with the PCIe Gen 4 protocol. 

The connectors can support up to 16 giga transmission per second (GT/s), doubling the performance of most previous COM connector generations. They also feature improved signal integrity supported by low insertion loss, return loss, PSNEXT, and PSFEXT, whether using both new receptacles and plugs or mating new receptacles with older plugs.

The connectors support system design flexibility with configuration options in stacking height (5mm, 8mm) and pin positions (220, 440). They can be an economic upgrade solution by keeping the same footprint as other COM standard interconnects. There is commonly no need for customers to change printed circuit board (PCB) footprints when upgrading applications. Per the company, the connectors offer improved mechanical design that can reduce mating and unmating force by about 30% compared to previous generations, allowing for more suitable operation.

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Tiera Oliver, Associate Editor for Embedded Computing Design, is responsible for web content edits, product news, and constructing stories. She also assists with newsletter updates as well as contributing and editing content for ECD podcasts and the ECD YouTube channel. Before working at ECD, Tiera graduated from Northern Arizona University where she received her B.S. in journalism and political science and worked as a news reporter for the university’s student led newspaper, The Lumberjack.

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