TrustInSoft Announces Zero Bug Vehicles with New Application Security Test

By Tiera Oliver

Associate Editor

Embedded Computing Design

June 09, 2021

News

TrustInSoft Announces Zero Bug Vehicles with New Application Security Test

TrustInSoft, a cybersecurity software company, announced a new Zero Bug Application Security Test (AST) for the automotive and autonomous driving market.

According to the company, the new Zero Bug AST proves the absence of bugs in car manufacturers' systems. The Zero Bug AST also leverages the TrustInSoft Analyzer to automate the power of Formal Methods testing, bringing the benefits to static and dynamic C/C++ source code analysis. TrustInSoft Analyzer democratizes Formal Methods by making its testing processes available to any developer at an affordable cost.

Per the company, TrustInSoft Analyzer's new Zero Bug AST automates Formal Methods testing using mathematics to guarantee the absence of bugs by running a substantial number of tests with the click of a button. Tests accelerate compliance with safety and cybersecurity standards such as ISO26262 and ISO21434.

"One corrupt line of code can cost automotive and autonomous driving manufacturers everything," said Fabrice Derepas, Founder and CEO of TrustInSoft. "Our new Zero Bug Application Security Test automates the power of Formal Methods for customers to save bug detection time by 40X, decrease code verification time by 4X, and avoid disastrous real world problems."

For more information visit: https://trust-in-soft.com/zero-bug-application-security-test/

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Tiera Oliver, Associate Editor for Embedded Computing Design, is responsible for web content edits, product news, and constructing stories. She also assists with newsletter updates as well as contributing and editing content for ECD podcasts and the ECD YouTube channel. Before working at ECD, Tiera graduated from Northern Arizona University where she received her B.S. in journalism and political science and worked as a news reporter for the university’s student led newspaper, The Lumberjack.

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