Murata Launches Ultra-Thin Low ESL MLCCs for ADAS Applications

By Tiera Oliver

Associate Editor

Embedded Computing Design

February 02, 2021

News

Murata Launches Ultra-Thin Low ESL MLCCs for ADAS Applications

Murata announced the ultra-thin LW reversed, low equivalent series inductor (ESL) multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) with a capacitance value of 1.0 µF ±20% for 4 Vdc-rated automotive applications.

 With a 0204 inch size (0.5 x 1.0 mm) footprint and maximum thickness of just 0.22 mm, the LLC152D70G105ME01 decoupling capacitor can be implemented on the back of a processor package, contributing to lower impedance of a power supply line. 

Compared to standard MLCCs, the LW reverse construction flips the electrodes through 90° so they are positioned on the long side of the rectangular chip. Per the company, this change in construction reverses the length-to-width ratio, providing effective noise suppression in high-frequency applications. 

As advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) continue to evolve to increase safety and, ultimately, deliver self-driving vehicles, ICs for in-vehicle equipment have become increasingly high-performance. To stabilize these ICs, more focus is being put on lowering the power supply lines’ impedance. With Murata’s proprietary thin layer technology for ceramic elements and thin-sheet formation technology, the LLC152D70G105ME01 LW reversed, low ESL chip MLCCs are effective for achieving a low-impedance design. 

For more information about the LLC152D70G105ME01 LW reversed, low ESL chip MLCCs, visit here.

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Murata Electronics

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Tiera Oliver, Associate Editor for Embedded Computing Design, is responsible for web content edits, product news, and constructing stories. She also assists with newsletter updates as well as contributing and editing content for ECD podcasts and the ECD YouTube channel. Before working at ECD, Tiera graduated from Northern Arizona University where she received her B.S. in journalism and political science and worked as a news reporter for the university’s student led newspaper, The Lumberjack.

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