First Cryptographic Companion Device Brings Pre-programmed Security to the Automotive Market

By Tiera Oliver

Assistant Editor

Embedded Computing Design

November 16, 2020

News

First Cryptographic Companion Device Brings Pre-programmed Security to the Automotive Market

Microchip’s new TrustAnchor device provides OEMs and their module suppliers with a simplified path to automotive network security, reducing costs and time to market.

Microchip Technology announced its CryptoAutomotive security IC, the TrustAnchor100 (TA100). The cryptographic companion device is designed to support in-vehicle network security solutions such as secure boot, firmware update and message authentication, including Controller Area Network (CAN) MAC at bus speed.

The TA100 provides an alternative in-vehicle network architecture implementation for secure boot and message authentication and, per the company, has already been approved by multiple OEMs around the world as a solution for EVITA Medium and EVITA Full HSM requirements. Its feature set was designed based on a review of several prominent OEM cybersecurity specifications to help facilitate a Tier 1’s pursuit of OEM Part Production Approval (PPAP).

Additionally, Microchip offers security specification and Request for Quote (RFQ) review services to assist Tier 1s in developing educated responses. The TA100 is designed to remove the challenges associated with secure code development and provisioning by offering pre-programmed cryptographic internal application code provisioned with asymmetric key-pairs and associated x.509 certificates.

Per the company, the device is confirmed with high resistance to attack through intensive third-party vulnerability assessments. It is AEC-Q100 Automotive Grade-1 qualified, FIPS 140-2 CMVP Security Level 2 rated, and Physical Key Protection Level 3 certified, and it has achieved the highest possible vulnerability assessment rating of Joint Interpretation Library (JIL) High. In addition, the TA100 provides software components like AUTOSAR drivers, MCALs, and Microchip’s CryptoAuthentication library that allow integration into the industry standard operating system, AUTOSAR, or customized software stacks for crypto functions.

The TA100 offers AUTOSAR compliant MCAL drivers that can be integrated into an AUTOSAR software stack. A full AUTOSAR reference stack is available, enabling automotive vendors to deploy the latest crypto standards into their automotive systems within standard automotive production environments. MikroBUS compatible socket boards are also available.

The TA100 is available in an 8- and 14-pin SOIC packages starting at $1.50 in 10,000-unit quantities.

For more information, visit: www.microchip.com.

Tiera Oliver, Assistant Editor for Embedded Computing Design, is responsible for web content edits and constructing stories. She also assists with newsletter updates as well as contributing and editing content for ECD podcasts and the ECD YouTube channel. Before working at ECD, Tiera graduated from Northern Arizona University where she received her B.S. in journalism and political science and worked as a news reporter for the university’s student led newspaper, The Lumberjack.

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